$5.95 is a great deal for a vibrator!

Since In the Next Room, or the vibrator play is right around the corner, we'll be feeding you some tidbits related to the play!

Despite the titillation factor of the play's subtitle, electric vibrators were less controversial in the late 19th and early 20th century than masturbation -- and even than the speculum and tampon! They were advertised regularly in mass market publications: Rachel Maine, author of The Technology of Orgasm, became interested in the subject when she started noticing ads in needlework magazines of the period (her original focus of research).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted Wednesday, February 2, 2011
Electricity is the great love of Dr. Givings' life, a subject of great fascination in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Greeks first became aware of electricity when they noticed that rubbing a piece of fur on amber created sparks. The word "electricity" was coined by Dr. William Gilbert, physician to Queen Elizabeth: he used it to describe the attractive force of rubbed amber - elektron is Greek for "amber." Gilbert also introduced several other terms related to electricity, including "magnetic pole." The idea of positive and negative charges was noticed in the 18th century, and given those names by our own Benjamin Franklin around 1750, around the same time he was experimenting with his kite, "electric kisses," and inventing the lightning rod. Of course, most of us probably learned about electricity during Saturday morning cartoons.

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